UPR Sexual Rights Database

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UN Member State that is reviewed on its human rights record as part of the UPR process.

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Source of Reference

Recommending State

UN Member State or Permanent Observer making sexual rights related recommendations, comments or asking questions to the State under Review.

Review Documentation

Sources of information used as the basis for a State’s review.  Includes the State’s National Report, UN Compilation Report and a Stakeholder Summary.

UN Regional Group to which State under Review belongs.

UN Regional Group to which Recommending State belongs.

This will only match recommendations where the Source of Review is a State.

Implementation notes

State responses to recommendations and issues raised in the UN Compilation and Stakeholder summary.

Displaying 176 - 200 of 39533 recommendations found
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Belgium

    Belgium
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    OIF
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Ensure the effective implementation of the Law on the Elimination of Violence against Women, including by raising awareness and increasing knowledge of the law among the population, police forces and the judiciary.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Maldives

    Maldives
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Continue to strengthen efforts aimed at eliminating all forms of violence against women and girls.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Romania

    Romania
    Regional group
    EEG
    Political group
    EU
    OIF
    Issue:
    • Empowerment of women
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Continue the steps undertaken in order to achieve the empowerment of women, especially in the economic field.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Finland

    Finland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Marginalized groups of women
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Improve and strengthen rights of persons with disabilities, especially women and girls with disabilities, economically, politically and socially by establishing policies and concrete actions at central and local levels.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Tunisia

    Tunisia
    Regional group
    Africa Group
    Political group
    AU
    OIC
    AL
    OIF
    Issue:
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Persevere in its praiseworthy efforts to promote women's rights, continue to attach high levels of importance to the human rights culture and pursue its dissemination among young generations within the framework of educational programmes.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 56) A number of serious and practical actions were taken in the direction of law enforcement and protection of women’s rights during the past four years. For example the establishment of Special Prosecution Office for Elimination of Violence against Women is one of important practical measures. The establishment of Human Rights Protection Unit of the MoJ as an inter-ministerial mechanism and establishment of human rights units in some other ministries and establishment of gender units in 22 ministries with the financial and technical support of the international community, extended efforts in establishment of infrastructure for the improvement of human rights situation in the country, preparation of NAPWA pursuant to UN Security Council Resolution 1325 are also a number of effectives measures that were adopted by the GIRoA. The MoFA has taken positive steps for improvement of human rights and the establishment of infrastructure.
    Para 59) The GIRoA has tried to promote culture of women's rights and human rights among the young generation through different government institutions within the framework of training programs during the past four years. The government has tried to support this goal through holding courses and training workshops regarding women's rights and human rights in different government institutions, particularly judicial organs, Ministry of Women's Affairs, Ministry of Education, Minisrty of Labour, Social Affair, Martyred, and Disabled, and other organizations under the government structure. The holding of training courses on women's rights, human rights and principles of a fair trial has been the main issues in the judicial organs. Other miscellaneous workshops have also been conducted in this regard by other relevant ministries. Preparation of NAPWA, inclusion in police curriculum and police academy of human rights subjects and advertising campaigns in girls' schools by police are part of this program. The existence of a ten year NAPWA, priority programs by the MoWA, holding of anti-violence campaigns against women, conducting of global conferences of religious leaders to promote the culture human rights are all the efforts made by this ministry towards ensuring women's rights.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Spain

    Spain
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    OEI
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Eradicate violence against women.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 8) The GIRoA has strived for inclusion of provisions of the conventions that it has ratified in its domestic laws. Provisions of the conventions were adopted in 10 legislations that were enacted within past years. ... Law on Elimination of Violence against Women, are the legislations which were passed and enforced in this period.
    Para 36) The MoWA in cooperation with government institutions, civil society, national and international organizations tried to improve the political, social, cultural and economic status of women by drafting various laws, policies and procedures in various fields such as: Regulation on Support Centers, reaching to female victims or women exposed to danger, drafting Law on Social Support, public awareness through media, training workshops, providing legal consultations for victim women, providing recommendations for presidential decrees on pardoning and reducing imprisonment terms of prisoners and juvenile offenders and legal aid on submitting and following the cases.
    Para 60) The GIRoA has always considered issues related to forced marriages and honour killings because they are violent acts against women and are prosecutable. The Special Prosecution Office has been established to fight crimes of violence against women. With respect to honour killings, although criminal policy of Afghanistan may in some instances consider honour killings carried out under the motive of upholding honour as mitigating circumstances, this has never realized to be a means for the acquittal of perpetrators. This law prosecutes them.
    Para 63) In order to improve the situation of women, the GIRoA has approved two laws, namely the Law on Elimination of Violence against Women and the Shiite Personal Status Law during the past four years. The GIRoA acknowledges that although these laws have not fully improved the situation of women in the country, it believes that these laws have had relatively positive impacts. It has also drafted the Law on Social Support for the improvement of the situation of women and is awaiting approval of the parliament.
    Para 81) The GIRoA has tried to equally protect all its citizens against any kinds of violence, but has made more efforts for protecting the vulnerable groups such as women and girls. In this regard, the government has taken specific measures during the past four years which we would like to indicate some of them here:
    - The first step in this regard is approval of the Law on Elimination of Violence against Women. Most of the acts that were committed against women were not considered as crimes in the past laws, but based on this law it is considered a crime and legal actions are taken against its perpetrators.
    - In order to practically implement the Law on Elimination of Violence against Women, the government has recently established a Special Prosecution Office for countering the violence against women. Until today, the mentioned Office has recorded about 23318 cases, 13200 of which have been reviewed and processed and the rest are being reviewed now. The other step that was taken in relation to the implementation of Law on Elimination of Violence against Women was establishment of the Commission for Elimination of Violence against Women.
    Para 94) The GIRoA has tried to overcome the impunity culture towards ensuring the rule of law, as the government considers this a serious obstacle against the rule of law. In this regard, the government has adopted several measures. … Establishment of the prosecution office for fighting against the violence against women, the judicial reforms that have been made by the judiciary of Afghanistan in relation to the Law on Elimination of Violence against Women and investigation of the cases of violence against women by the Prosecution Office for Elimination of Violence against Women and the Afghan courts are the other examples of intensification of fighting against the impunity culture …
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    National Report

    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    • Women's participation
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    According to the second Pillar of the ANDS (Afghan National Development Strategy): Governance, Rule of Law, and Human Rights, certain benchmarks should be met among which are: support and monitoring and development of human rights, consolidation of democratic institutions and rule of law, providing public services, accountability, gender equality, promoting the political participation of women in state and non-state activities, and implementation of action plan for development of women at national level by the year 2010, including providing legal privileges for women in the law. Based on these benchmarks the GoA will allocate a minimum 35 per cent participation in vocational training, a minimum of 20 per cent employment opportunities, and will lower the gender disparity for ensuring access to justice to 50 per cent by 2013. [Para 42]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    National Report

    Issue:
    • Sexual abuse
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    Children also are subject to different forms of violence, such as smuggling or abduction, exploitation, or sexual abuse. [Para 84]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Stakeholder Summary

    Issue:
    • Sexual abuse
    • Sexual exploitation / slavery
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    World Vision Afghanistan (WWA) noted recent reports suggesting that Afghanistan is a primary country where children are abducted, smuggled over the borders, and sold as sex slaves or child labourers in the neighbouring countries or in the Gulf States. Reports indicate that sexual violence against Afghan boys is common throughout the country, but is most prevalent in the north. In northern Afghanistan, "Bacha bereesh" (beardless boys) are kept by powerful older men who sexually abuse them. [Para 15]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Greece

    Greece
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    OIF
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take all possible actions to eliminate all forms of violence against women and amend all Laws that discriminate against women.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:

    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;
    Para 105) The Criminal Procedure Code 2014 and Penal Code 2018 have been ratified. Discriminatory human rights violating elements have been taken out and new provisions regarding protection of women’s rights were included. The criminal procedures law enriches specific provisions on the victim’s rights and protection of evidence. Beside the new penal code, the EVAW Law still remains enforced and the cases related to violence against women will be reviewed in accordance with this specific law.
    Para 106) Different measures for better implementation of the EVAW Law have been taken in to account. These measures include the establishment of institutions, policies, regulations, training of judges, prosecutors, police, and other relevant employees as well as legal awareness campaigns for citizens. The AGO plans to draft a National Action Plan for the Implementation of EVAW Law in near future.
    Para 107) Following mechanisms are in place:
    • Monthly meetings of the EVAW high commission and provincial commissions of all 34 provinces to monitor critical areas. Findings are being submitted to the relevant government departments and the President’s office. Establishment of 28 women’s shelters centers in Kabul and 20 in different provinces.
    • Establishment of special units at all 34 Provincial Office of Attorney’s for EVAW cases. In 31 provinces, units are just being led by women.
    • Establishment of special EVAW units at the Supreme Court in Kabul and 15 provinces.
    • Legal assistance centers and family dispute resolution units were established in 34 provinces under the police headquarters framework.
    • A mediation department has been established at the AGO to mediate in family matters.
    • The Supreme Court established special courts for EVAW cases in 22 provinces. Till 2020 all provinces will be having a special court for EVAW cases.
    • A telephone hotline has been established for women and children in case of violence.
    • On 11th of July 2016, the MoI established a complaint mechanism to prevent and respond to sexual harassment against women police officers.
    Para 108) The AGO established a Deputy AGO for Elimination of Violence against Women & Children, which is led by a woman. This office has two sub-departments responsible for reducing violence against women and for its social consultants. Another department deals with women rights, victims and witnesses with help of IDLO.
    Para 109) The Afghanistan AGO established a monitoring mechanism on the implementation of EVAW law within its offices.
    Para 110) With support of IDLO the AGO established a database within the Deputy AGO for EVAW. This database includes all activities of prosecutors, the case itself and the work which has been done so far. Through this database, the Deputy GA can monitor his employees and held them accountable if needed.
    Para 111) Between 2014 and 2018, 5921 cases have been investigated. 4840 cases of violence against women have been addressed in the three-layer courts of the country based on the provisions of EVAW.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 25) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the ongoing armed conflict affected women’s access to justice. The Mission noted that the failure of law enforcement authorities to take action undermined efforts to promote the rights of women, eroded the rule of law and contributed to an expectation of impunity. It observed that the gap in relation to the available range of punishments for criminal offences of violence against women contributed to the wide use of mediation. The Mission highlighted that the wide use of mediation in criminal offences of violence against women also promoted impunity, enabled its reoccurrence, eroded trust in the legal system and constituted a human rights violation on the part of Afghanistan.
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 44) The Secretary-General of the United Nations noted the decree amending the Penal Code with regard to crimes of violence against women ...
    Para 45) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that harmful acts of violence against women, including murder, beating, mutilation, child marriage and ba’ad, remained widespread, despite the Government’s concrete efforts to criminalize those practices and establish measures for accountability. Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Mexico

    Mexico
    Regional group
    GRULAC
    Political group
    OAS
    OEI
    ACS
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Ensure that access to education is not hampered by differences, particular gender, and take necessary measures to guarantee security of female students and staff members.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 84) The MoE has developed its third National Education Strategic Plan (2017–2021) with its main goals: (1) Provision of pre-school education (50% of which is for girls), Provision of local educational classes and accelerated education for children left out of school (50% of which is for girls) (2) Increasing the ratio of girls’ admission to technical and vocational institutions from 17% in 2015 to 26% by 2021 (3) Conducting on job trainings for newly recruited female teachers as well as provision of literacy courses for women and raising it from 60% to 100% by 2021 (4) Increasing the number of female literacy students from 53% in 2015 to 60% by 2021 and provision of emergency educational programs for children of IDPs and Repatriates. (50% of which is for girls) (5) Launching awareness raising programs on the importance of education for girls, provision of financial incentives and stipends for female teachers during on-job trainings (6) Provision of pre-work courses for female students and provision of Master’s degree education for the instructors of teacher training institutions that include women (7) Provision of health services in the schools for both male and female and provision of literacy classes across the country aimed at increasing the rate of female admission in the literacy courses from 53% to 60% by 2021 (8). Increasing percentage of female teachers in Schools to 34%.
    Para 86) The official statistics of the MoE states, the number of school students in Afghanistan, including private and public schools, reached 9,234,459 persons, of which 5,703,160 are boys and 3,531,299 are girls.
    Para 87) A national policy for girl education has been drafted by the MoE. This policy focuses on delivering quality education and awareness campaigns among the public.
    Para 88) The MoHE implemented a Strategy and Regulation which deals with women education in particular. Through these documents, women quota has been introduced, which is that 24% of all university students are girls in 2017.
    Para 92) 3,000 female teachers have been sent out to remote areas to educate girls. The MoE special educational program named IQRA, enhances access to education and ensures the quality of education in 17 remote provinces, which are classified as low-level education areas for children, particularly girls.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 38) … In addition to barriers to education arising from insecurity, throughout 2015, anti-government elements had deliberately restricted women and girls’ access to education, which included the closure of girls’ schools and complete bans on education for women and girls.
    Para 40) UNESCO noted that despite the Government’s efforts, girls and women faced serious challenges in accessing and completing their education, with education being more a privilege than a right. Members of Taliban groups had also openly declared their opposition to the education of girls and had used violent attacks against girls, their families and teachers. Early marriages often had a direct and adverse impact on girls’ education, compromising their education opportunities and resulting in higher dropout rates.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 33) ODVV noted that one of the outcomes of the spread of war and conflict is the restriction of the right to education. As a result of increased insecurity, hundreds of schools have closed and many children that include two-thirds of girls have been deprived of education. In spite of improvement in access to education, in some areas, security concerns and social traditions are still major obstacles in the way of girls’ access to education. In parts of the country where children can attend school, there are not enough available facilities. Altogether 41 percent of schools do not have a building. And the distance between where many of these children live from school is so long that they are not able to attend classes in schools. The lack of standard schools and the long distance alongside cultural issues and insecurity have great impacts on the deprivation of girls from education.
    Para 36) HRW noted that the number of girls in school is falling due not only to insecurity, but to discriminatory practices, lack of female teachers, and schools that lack boundary walls and toilets. In the second UPR cycle, eight recommendations urged the Afghan government to ensure equal access to education for women and girls. Girls currently represented about 40 percent of the nearly 9 million children attending school in Afghanistan. By 2018, those percentages have fallen, and the situation for girls’ education is getting worse. For the first time since 2002 the number of Afghan children studying is falling. HRW report found that while deteriorating security is a significant barrier to girls’ education, girls were at increasing risk of missing school due to discrimination against girls within the school system, child marriage, lack of female teachers; and lack of facilities including boundary walls and toilets. The Afghan government has 5,260 boys’ schools but only 2,531 girls’ schools, and 60 percent of Afghan government schools have no toilets, which deters girls, especially those who have begun menstruation, from attending school.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Finland

    Finland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Guarantee women's representation in all decision-making levels in line with the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and related resolutions as well as on the CEDAW.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 117) The National Action Plan for UNSC Resolution 1325 from 2015–2022 has been ratified by the Afghan Government on July 1, 2015. It consists of 4 pillars48 and 39 indicators which empower women, ensures their participation in peace process and good governance.
    Para 118) Women’s contribution in the High Peace Council has increased since 2015. The new HPC leadership has paid special attention to the value, respect, and importance of women’s presence in the peace process which is one of the priorities of the HPC. One Deputy is a Woman and there are now 12 women out of 65 members. The HPC has 800 employees in Kabul and provinces, out of which 134 are women. The percentage of women has been increased from 11 to 22 percent at the provincial level.
    Para 119) Women representatives took part in peace negotiation in Oslo with Taliban in 2015.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 47) OHCHR/UNAMA reported that the Government continued to carry out the Afghan national plan for the implementation of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security, but its efforts were hampered by lack of funding.
    UN Compilation:
    Para 48) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that despite some progress, the number of women in positions of decision-making remained low. On 2 July 2017, five new female members had been nominated to the High Peace Council. The 480 members of the High Peace Council and the provincial peace councils included 65 women. However, only one of the seven sections of the Joint Secretariat of the Council was led by a woman.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Iceland

    Iceland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Reinforce the implementation of the Law on the Elimination of Violence against Women.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:

    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;
    Para 105) The Criminal Procedure Code 2014 and Penal Code 2018 have been ratified. Discriminatory human rights violating elements have been taken out and new provisions regarding protection of women’s rights were included. The criminal procedures law enriches specific provisions on the victim’s rights and protection of evidence. Beside the new penal code, the EVAW Law still remains enforced and the cases related to violence against women will be reviewed in accordance with this specific law.
    Para 106) Different measures for better implementation of the EVAW Law have been taken in to account. These measures include the establishment of institutions, policies, regulations, training of judges, prosecutors, police, and other relevant employees as well as legal awareness campaigns for citizens. The AGO plans to draft a National Action Plan for the Implementation of EVAW Law in near future.
    Para 107) Following mechanisms are in place:
    • Monthly meetings of the EVAW high commission and provincial commissions of all 34 provinces to monitor critical areas. Findings are being submitted to the relevant government departments and the President’s office. Establishment of 28 women’s shelters centers in Kabul and 20 in different provinces.
    • Establishment of special units at all 34 Provincial Office of Attorney’s for EVAW cases. In 31 provinces, units are just being led by women.
    • Establishment of special EVAW units at the Supreme Court in Kabul and 15 provinces.
    • Legal assistance centers and family dispute resolution units were established in 34 provinces under the police headquarters framework.
    • A mediation department has been established at the AGO to mediate in family matters.
    • The Supreme Court established special courts for EVAW cases in 22 provinces. Till 2020 all provinces will be having a special court for EVAW cases.
    • A telephone hotline has been established for women and children in case of violence.
    • On 11th of July 2016, the MoI established a complaint mechanism to prevent and respond to sexual harassment against women police officers.
    Para 108) The AGO established a Deputy AGO for Elimination of Violence against Women & Children, which is led by a woman. This office has two sub-departments responsible for reducing violence against women and for its social consultants. Another department deals with women rights, victims and witnesses with help of IDLO.
    Para 109) The Afghanistan AGO established a monitoring mechanism on the implementation of EVAW law within its offices.
    Para 110) With support of IDLO the AGO established a database within the Deputy AGO for EVAW. This database includes all activities of prosecutors, the case itself and the work which has been done so far. Through this database, the Deputy GA can monitor his employees and held them accountable if needed.
    Para 111) Between 2014 and 2018, 5921 cases have been investigated. 4840 cases of violence against women have been addressed in the three-layer courts of the country based on the provisions of EVAW.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 25) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the ongoing armed conflict affected women’s access to justice. The Mission noted that the failure of law enforcement authorities to take action undermined efforts to promote the rights of women, eroded the rule of law and contributed to an expectation of impunity. It observed that the gap in relation to the available range of punishments for criminal offences of violence against women contributed to the wide use of mediation. The Mission highlighted that the wide use of mediation in criminal offences of violence against women also promoted impunity, enabled its reoccurrence, eroded trust in the legal system and constituted a human rights violation on the part of Afghanistan.
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 44) The Secretary-General of the United Nations noted the decree amending the Penal Code with regard to crimes of violence against women ...
    Para 45) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that harmful acts of violence against women, including murder, beating, mutilation, child marriage and ba’ad, remained widespread, despite the Government’s concrete efforts to criminalize those practices and establish measures for accountability. Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Chile

    Chile
    Regional group
    GRULAC
    Political group
    OAS
    OEI
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Adopt additional measures to ensure the effective application of the law to eliminate violence against women and to ensure the protection of women's rights.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:

    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;
    Para 105) The Criminal Procedure Code 2014 and Penal Code 2018 have been ratified. Discriminatory human rights violating elements have been taken out and new provisions regarding protection of women’s rights were included. The criminal procedures law enriches specific provisions on the victim’s rights and protection of evidence. Beside the new penal code, the EVAW Law still remains enforced and the cases related to violence against women will be reviewed in accordance with this specific law.
    Para 106) Different measures for better implementation of the EVAW Law have been taken in to account. These measures include the establishment of institutions, policies, regulations, training of judges, prosecutors, police, and other relevant employees as well as legal awareness campaigns for citizens. The AGO plans to draft a National Action Plan for the Implementation of EVAW Law in near future.
    Para 107) Following mechanisms are in place:
    • Monthly meetings of the EVAW high commission and provincial commissions of all 34 provinces to monitor critical areas. Findings are being submitted to the relevant government departments and the President’s office. Establishment of 28 women’s shelters centers in Kabul and 20 in different provinces.
    • Establishment of special units at all 34 Provincial Office of Attorney’s for EVAW cases. In 31 provinces, units are just being led by women.
    • Establishment of special EVAW units at the Supreme Court in Kabul and 15 provinces.
    • Legal assistance centers and family dispute resolution units were established in 34 provinces under the police headquarters framework.
    • A mediation department has been established at the AGO to mediate in family matters.
    • The Supreme Court established special courts for EVAW cases in 22 provinces. Till 2020 all provinces will be having a special court for EVAW cases.
    • A telephone hotline has been established for women and children in case of violence.
    • On 11th of July 2016, the MoI established a complaint mechanism to prevent and respond to sexual harassment against women police officers.
    Para 108) The AGO established a Deputy AGO for Elimination of Violence against Women & Children, which is led by a woman. This office has two sub-departments responsible for reducing violence against women and for its social consultants. Another department deals with women rights, victims and witnesses with help of IDLO.
    Para 109) The Afghanistan AGO established a monitoring mechanism on the implementation of EVAW law within its offices.
    Para 110) With support of IDLO the AGO established a database within the Deputy AGO for EVAW. This database includes all activities of prosecutors, the case itself and the work which has been done so far. Through this database, the Deputy GA can monitor his employees and held them accountable if needed.
    Para 111) Between 2014 and 2018, 5921 cases have been investigated. 4840 cases of violence against women have been addressed in the three-layer courts of the country based on the provisions of EVAW.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 25) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the ongoing armed conflict affected women’s access to justice. The Mission noted that the failure of law enforcement authorities to take action undermined efforts to promote the rights of women, eroded the rule of law and contributed to an expectation of impunity. It observed that the gap in relation to the available range of punishments for criminal offences of violence against women contributed to the wide use of mediation. The Mission highlighted that the wide use of mediation in criminal offences of violence against women also promoted impunity, enabled its reoccurrence, eroded trust in the legal system and constituted a human rights violation on the part of Afghanistan.
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 44) The Secretary-General of the United Nations noted the decree amending the Penal Code with regard to crimes of violence against women ...
    Para 45) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that harmful acts of violence against women, including murder, beating, mutilation, child marriage and ba’ad, remained widespread, despite the Government’s concrete efforts to criminalize those practices and establish measures for accountability. Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    United Kingdom

    United Kingdom
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • "Honour crimes"
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Unclear Response
    Contents:
    Repeal article 398 of the Penal Code which gives perpetrators of honour killings legal concessions.
    Explanation
    The Islamic Republic of Afghanistan wants to review and assess these recommendations until the translation and assessment of barriers and their implementation opportunity. Most of these recommendations require Afghanistan accession to some conventions and their optional protocols. Since accession to some conventions and their optional protocols is a long process and needs extensive consultation and professional studies, therefore, the Government of Afghanistan scrutinize the above Recommendations once again.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 11) Reforming the Criminal Justice, the new code introduces alternatives to imprisonment and detention. As well as, the code has removed permission of honor killing to prevent arbitrary and illegal murders.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 45) … Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Spain

    Spain
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    OEI
    Issue:
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    • "Adultery"
    Type:
    Question
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Not Followed up with a Recommendation
    Contents:
    A General Attorney's Directive issued on April 2012 establishes that abandoning one's home is not a crime according to Afghan law. It also establishes that it must not be considered as an aggravating factor the fact of a women or a girl that flees her home with the aim of committing adultery (zina) or trying to commit it (attempted zina). What specific measures have been taken in Afghanistan to make judges and attorneys implement what has been established in this directive?
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    National Report

    Issue:
    • Trafficking in women and / or girls
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    The GIRoA has taken the following steps for health strategy and to reduce poverty:
    ... • establishment of communication network to control/prevent trafficking of women and children; [Para 117]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    UN Compilation

    Issue:
    • Early marriage
    • Harmful practices based on cultural / traditional values
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    CRC urged Afghanistan to raise the minimum age of marriage for girls to 18. [Para 57]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    National Report

    Issue:
    • Maternal health / morbidity / mortality
    • Sexually transmitted infections
    • HIV and AIDS
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    31st Session, November 2018
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    Expansion of healthcare centers and healthcare services in Kabul and provinces. The followings are some important examples which are being implemented across the country: … • To prevent young people contracting by AIDS, a national program for control of AIDS has been conducted. 7100 school students and 3126 university students have been trained on the hazards and risks of addiction and sexual transmitted diseases in 2016. ... Hospitals or Department for gynecology and obstetrics in Parwan, Balkh and Panshir have been established. Also 15000 health councils for men and women, responsible to create awareness among the people who are living in rural areas have been established. [Para 82]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Stakeholder Summary

    Issue:
    • Sexual abuse
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    31st Session, November 2018
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    AIHRC’s national inquiry in 2017, showed 13 percent of children have been sexually assaulted, [Para 11]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Switzerland

    Switzerland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    OIF
    Issue:
    • Women's participation
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Prioritize the implementation of Afghanistan’s National Plan of Action on Women, Peace and Security, in particular by ensuring broad participation of civil society, especially women, at all stages of a peace process.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Slovakia

    Slovakia
    Regional group
    EEG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Exercise fair treatment of women and girls before the law and effective enforcement of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Iran

    Iran
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Issue:
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Continue efforts to promote economic, social and cultural rights of the people, in particular vulnerable social groups, such as women, children, persons with disabilities, refugees, returnees and IDPs who have suffered a lot from the internal wars.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    United States

    United States
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    OAS
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Ensure the full implementation of the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law and the 2018 Penal Code’s provisions related to violence against women and girls.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Iraq

    Iraq
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    AL
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Develop special programs to reduce violence against women.