UPR Sexual Rights Database

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UN Member State that is reviewed on its human rights record as part of the UPR process.

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Source of Reference

Recommending State

UN Member State or Permanent Observer making sexual rights related recommendations, comments or asking questions to the State under Review.

Review Documentation

Sources of information used as the basis for a State’s review.  Includes the State’s National Report, UN Compilation Report and a Stakeholder Summary.

UN Regional Group to which State under Review belongs.

UN Regional Group to which Recommending State belongs.

This will only match recommendations where the Source of Review is a State.

Implementation notes

State responses to recommendations and issues raised in the UN Compilation and Stakeholder summary.

Displaying 51 - 75 of 52939 recommendations found
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    UN Compilation

    Issue:
    • "Honour crimes"
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    The SR on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions stated that honour killings continue to be widespread and numerous. [Para 17]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    United Kingdom

    United Kingdom
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Complete implementation of the 10 year National Action Plan for Women, with a particular focus on the most vulnerable.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 52) Relevant ministries and government organizations carried out important tasks for the realization of the NAPWA and poverty reduction. The undertaken tasks are as follows: • Preparation of policy assisting women in private sector; • Preparation of policy aimed to solve the problems of Kochi (nomad) women; • Preparation of strategy on rights and economic security of women; … • Administration/management of 548 private sector companies by women; • Sending 38611 female personnel abroad for higher education and capacity building; • Establishment of loan cooperatives for women; • Establishment of 78 small and medium cooperatives for women.
    Para 55) The MoWA included NAPWA into 6 main sectors and are as follows: 1) security and immunity, 2) protection of women's rights, 3) the leadership of political participation of women, 4) economy, work and poverty reduction, 5) health and 6) education. NAPWA was approved in 2008 and all government institutions are bound to implement this plan. As a 10-year strategic plan, the Government shall be bound to eliminate discrimination against women, develop human resources and strengthen their leadership role, enhance public awareness, build capacity, reduce poverty, unemployment, illiteracy, mortality, provide access to work opportunities, education, health services, and secure justice at different social levels.
    Para 113) The (NAPWA) has been prepared to create coordinated and systematic activities to improve the situation of women in six areas that include security and safety, protection of human rights of women, women leadership and political participation, economic and poverty, health and education. Majority of projects and programs have been implemented or are in the process of implementation through understanding and signing of protocols and agreements with government and non-government organizations. MoWA in this respect only has the role of monitoring and providing technical assistance in the implementation of projects. These projects have contributed considerably to the improvement of situation of women. The participation of women in all areas, including peace process, political and social participation in accordance with the Afghan Constitution has been ensured and women organizations are engaged under the auspices of government in different areas of political and social life.
    Para 126) Implementation of the NAPWA was scrutinized and monitored in many departments of the Ministry of Education and the terms of reference have been developed for Gender Unit on the basis of the NAPWA. 275 staff, women and men, of the Ministry of Education participated in five rounds of training workshops on issues of gender, equality of rights, raising awareness on gender related issues and women’s rights in Islam. These training workshops contributed to the raising of awareness of the participants regarding the rights of women and have had positive impacts. The Human Resources of the Ministry of Education envisages the process of personnel recruitment on the basis of merit and women are given the priority and their recruitment takes place on merit basis.
    Para 137) Targeted groups for Social Safety Network are indigent families with female breadwinners and families that have children below 14 years of age, indigent disables, widows …
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    UN Compilation

    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    31st Session, November 2018
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    UNESCO encouraged Afghanistan to adopt all necessary legal and regulatory measures to eliminate violence and discrimination against girls and women. UNAMA and UNESCO urged Afghanistan to amend the Elimination of Violence against Women Law and ensure that legislation was consistent. [Para 45]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Kyrgyzstan

    Kyrgyzstan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    CIS
    Issue:
    • International human rights instruments
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Unclear Response
    Contents:
    Ratify the OP-CEDAW.
    Explanation
    Noted. The content of the noted recommendations is either accession to a particular international human rights instruments asked for abolition of the death penalty and/ or establishing a moratorium on executions, and reducing the number of crimes carrying capital punishment. Each clustered recommendation will be explained as follows:
    (a) Accession to international human rights instruments: Afghanistan is already a state party to seven core International Human Rights Conventions and three optional protocols that demonstrates its commitment to promote and protect human rights. Taking into consideration the fact that the accession to international human rights instruments obligates the state party to ensure the compliance of its provisions at the national level, Afghanistan is willing to review its national structures prior to considering the accession to further international human rights instruments and thereafter decides upon them in due time.

  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Lithuania

    Lithuania
    Regional group
    EEG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Women's participation
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Enhances its efforts to effectively implement UN Security Council resolution on Women, Peace and Security and ensure women’s full participation in peace process.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Slovakia

    Slovakia
    Regional group
    EEG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Human rights defenders
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    End impunity for threats, acts of intimidation, harassment and violence faced by women and civil society actors, and ensure their prompt and thorough investigation.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Iceland

    Iceland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Issue:
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take concrete steps to realize the right to primary and secondary education for girls by ending discriminatory practices, recruiting more female teachers, and ensuring that all schools have adequate boundary walls, toilets and access to safe water.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Cyprus

    Cyprus
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    EU
    OIF
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • "Honour crimes"
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Prosecute violence against women, notably the so-called honour killings.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Vietnam

    Vietnam
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    ASEAN
    OIF
    Issue:
    • International human rights instruments
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Accelerate domestication process of international human rights laws to which Afghanistan is a member, in particular the ICCPR, CEDAW, CRC.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Nepal

    Nepal
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Continue legislative and administrative reforms to prevent all forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Algeria

    Algeria
    Regional group
    Africa Group
    Political group
    AU
    OIC
    AL
    Issue:
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Continue the efforts aiming at promotion and protection of the rights of women.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:
    • Legislative Power: the Commission on Women affairs, civil society and human rights in the Parliament;
    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;

    UN Compilation:
    Para 43) The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women) observed that women and girls continued to face persistent discrimination, violence, street harassment, forced and child marriage, severe restrictions on working and studying outside the home and limited access to justice. It noted that the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had the potential to contribute to improving women’s access to justice, provided it was effectively implemented.
    Para 46) OHCHR/UNAMA reported that anti-government elements, particularly the Taliban, continued to impose restrictions that seriously limited enjoyment of human rights, specifically for women and girls.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Thailand

    Thailand
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    ASEAN
    Issue:
    • Birth registration
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take appropriate measures to ensure birth registration of all children born in the country, in order to reduce the risk of statelessness.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Ethiopia

    Ethiopia
    Regional group
    Africa Group
    Political group
    AU
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    • Women's and / or girls' rights
    • Women's participation
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take necessary measures to increase the percentage of women in decision-making positions.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 120) The Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC) has implemented a policy aiming to increase the number of women by 2%. They furthermore have conducted awareness raising activities for female college students. It has furthermore created a CV pool of women eligible to apply for civil service positions to ensure equity in the Government. The gender representatives of Ministries and Independent Institutions are present during recruitment processes and in order to increase the ratio of women’s recruitment, a 5% extra mark is considered for female applicants in accordance with the recruitment manual.
    Para 121) Women’s representation in different areas:
    • National Assembly 27%.
    • Provincial Councils 20,9%.
    • Cabinet 15%.
    • Decision Making levels of the Government 10%.
    • Health Sector 33%.
    • Private Sector 21,7%.
    • Government Agencies 26%.
    • Judiciary 12%.
    • Security Sector 1%.
    • Decision Making levels of private sector 9,8%.
    • Private Sector 21,7%.
    • Economic Sector 6 %.
    • The percentage of women at the AGO increased from 15 % 2017 to 23 % in 2018. It has 10 women directors. The AGO offered an internship for 241 women. 153 of them got a job at the AGO.
    • The women percentage at the Supreme Court is 23 %.
    • The 2016 Elections Law has taken into consideration the 25% women’s quota in the district councils and stipulates that “At least 25% of the seats should be dedicated to women candidates in each district council”.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 31) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the Government had been making efforts to build a representative political system and national institutions by increasing the representation of ethnic communities and women, particularly through the parliamentary elections. Despite those efforts, women remained underrepresented in the political sphere at the national, provincial and district levels, and their representation in the institutions of governance remained low. Moreover, women’s meaningful participation in decision-making processes required serious attention.
    UN Compilation:
    Para 48) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that despite some progress, the number of women in positions of decision-making remained low. On 2 July 2017, five new female members had been nominated to the High Peace Council. The 480 members of the High Peace Council and the provincial peace councils included 65 women. However, only one of the seven sections of the Joint Secretariat of the Council was led by a woman.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Outcome Report

    Issue:
    • Early marriage
    • Abortion
    • Harmful practices based on cultural / traditional values
    • Forced marriage
    • Polygamy
    • "Honour crimes"
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Comment
    Session:
    32nd Session, January 2019
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    The Association of World Citizens ... welcomed the development of a national action plan to end the harmful practices such as early and forced marriage and the new Penal Code to limit honour killings and other harmful practices. However, the situation of women and girls remained a great concern, including their forced marriages, violence and street harassment. It was disappointed that the polygamy was still not outlawed. It was also worried about the health of women, as the recommendations regarding the legal and safe access of women to voluntary termination of pregnancy were not accepted. [Para 487]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Canada

    Canada
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    OAS
    OIF
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    • Training for state personnel on sexual rights issues
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take steps to fully implement the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, including by providing training and capacity-building to law enforcement officials; implementing standard, country-wide procedures to record and track complaints of violence against women; and ensuring that all allegations of violence against women are thoroughly investigated and referred to the appropriate authorities under Afghan law.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:

    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;
    Para 33) In 2014, AIHRC and MOI have signed an MoU to train police officers in human rights subjects, particularly women rights and children. So far, 1200 police officers have received human rights education.
    Para 36) MoWA, as secretary of and in collaboration with all members of National High Commission on EVAW, has conducted awareness raising workshops about women rights as well as prohibition of violence against women and girls for 595 governmental and non-governmental employees in the capital and provinces during 2014–2015.
    Para 105) The Criminal Procedure Code 2014 and Penal Code 2018 have been ratified. Discriminatory human rights violating elements have been taken out and new provisions regarding protection of women’s rights were included. The criminal procedures law enriches specific provisions on the victim’s rights and protection of evidence. Beside the new penal code, the EVAW Law still remains enforced and the cases related to violence against women will be reviewed in accordance with this specific law.
    Para 106) Different measures for better implementation of the EVAW Law have been taken in to account. These measures include the establishment of institutions, policies, regulations, training of judges, prosecutors, police, and other relevant employees as well as legal awareness campaigns for citizens. The AGO plans to draft a National Action Plan for the Implementation of EVAW Law in near future.
    Para 107) Following mechanisms are in place:
    • Monthly meetings of the EVAW high commission and provincial commissions of all 34 provinces to monitor critical areas. Findings are being submitted to the relevant government departments and the President’s office. Establishment of 28 women’s shelters centers in Kabul and 20 in different provinces.
    • Establishment of special units at all 34 Provincial Office of Attorney’s for EVAW cases. In 31 provinces, units are just being led by women.
    • Establishment of special EVAW units at the Supreme Court in Kabul and 15 provinces.
    • Legal assistance centers and family dispute resolution units were established in 34 provinces under the police headquarters framework.
    • A mediation department has been established at the AGO to mediate in family matters.
    • The Supreme Court established special courts for EVAW cases in 22 provinces. Till 2020 all provinces will be having a special court for EVAW cases.
    • A telephone hotline has been established for women and children in case of violence.
    • On 11th of July 2016, the MoI established a complaint mechanism to prevent and respond to sexual harassment against women police officers.
    Para 108) The AGO established a Deputy AGO for Elimination of Violence against Women & Children, which is led by a woman. This office has two sub-departments responsible for reducing violence against women and for its social consultants. Another department deals with women rights, victims and witnesses with help of IDLO.
    Para 109) The Afghanistan AGO established a monitoring mechanism on the implementation of EVAW law within its offices.
    Para 110) With support of IDLO the AGO established a database within the Deputy AGO for EVAW. This database includes all activities of prosecutors, the case itself and the work which has been done so far. Through this database, the Deputy GA can monitor his employees and held them accountable if needed.
    Para 111) Between 2014 and 2018, 5921 cases have been investigated. 4840 cases of violence against women have been addressed in the three-layer courts of the country based on the provisions of EVAW.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 25) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the ongoing armed conflict affected women’s access to justice. The Mission noted that the failure of law enforcement authorities to take action undermined efforts to promote the rights of women, eroded the rule of law and contributed to an expectation of impunity. It observed that the gap in relation to the available range of punishments for criminal offences of violence against women contributed to the wide use of mediation. The Mission highlighted that the wide use of mediation in criminal offences of violence against women also promoted impunity, enabled its reoccurrence, eroded trust in the legal system and constituted a human rights violation on the part of Afghanistan.
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 44) The Secretary-General of the United Nations noted the decree amending the Penal Code with regard to crimes of violence against women ...en.
    Para 45) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that harmful acts of violence against women, including murder, beating, mutilation, child marriage and ba’ad, remained widespread, despite the Government’s concrete efforts to criminalize those practices and establish measures for accountability. Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Australia

    Australia
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    PIF
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Take action to fully implement and enforce the 2009 Elimination of Violence against Women Law.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 26) The GoIRA protects and promotes human rights by strengthening and establishing human rights units within the power structures as following:

    • Judiciary Power: Division of Violence Against Women and Children in the Supreme Court review all cases of women and children rights violations;
    Para 105) The Criminal Procedure Code 2014 and Penal Code 2018 have been ratified. Discriminatory human rights violating elements have been taken out and new provisions regarding protection of women’s rights were included. The criminal procedures law enriches specific provisions on the victim’s rights and protection of evidence. Beside the new penal code, the EVAW Law still remains enforced and the cases related to violence against women will be reviewed in accordance with this specific law.
    Para 106) Different measures for better implementation of the EVAW Law have been taken in to account. These measures include the establishment of institutions, policies, regulations, training of judges, prosecutors, police, and other relevant employees as well as legal awareness campaigns for citizens. The AGO plans to draft a National Action Plan for the Implementation of EVAW Law in near future.
    Para 107) Following mechanisms are in place:
    • Monthly meetings of the EVAW high commission and provincial commissions of all 34 provinces to monitor critical areas. Findings are being submitted to the relevant government departments and the President’s office. Establishment of 28 women’s shelters centers in Kabul and 20 in different provinces.
    • Establishment of special units at all 34 Provincial Office of Attorney’s for EVAW cases. In 31 provinces, units are just being led by women.
    • Establishment of special EVAW units at the Supreme Court in Kabul and 15 provinces.
    • Legal assistance centers and family dispute resolution units were established in 34 provinces under the police headquarters framework.
    • A mediation department has been established at the AGO to mediate in family matters.
    • The Supreme Court established special courts for EVAW cases in 22 provinces. Till 2020 all provinces will be having a special court for EVAW cases.
    • A telephone hotline has been established for women and children in case of violence.
    • On 11th of July 2016, the MoI established a complaint mechanism to prevent and respond to sexual harassment against women police officers.
    Para 108) The AGO established a Deputy AGO for Elimination of Violence against Women & Children, which is led by a woman. This office has two sub-departments responsible for reducing violence against women and for its social consultants. Another department deals with women rights, victims and witnesses with help of IDLO.
    Para 109) The Afghanistan AGO established a monitoring mechanism on the implementation of EVAW law within its offices.
    Para 110) With support of IDLO the AGO established a database within the Deputy AGO for EVAW. This database includes all activities of prosecutors, the case itself and the work which has been done so far. Through this database, the Deputy GA can monitor his employees and held them accountable if needed.
    Para 111) Between 2014 and 2018, 5921 cases have been investigated. 4840 cases of violence against women have been addressed in the three-layer courts of the country based on the provisions of EVAW.

    UN Compilation:
    Para 25) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that the ongoing armed conflict affected women’s access to justice. The Mission noted that the failure of law enforcement authorities to take action undermined efforts to promote the rights of women, eroded the rule of law and contributed to an expectation of impunity. It observed that the gap in relation to the available range of punishments for criminal offences of violence against women contributed to the wide use of mediation. The Mission highlighted that the wide use of mediation in criminal offences of violence against women also promoted impunity, enabled its reoccurrence, eroded trust in the legal system and constituted a human rights violation on the part of Afghanistan.
    Para 42) The Committee against Torture remained deeply concerned by the high prevalence of violence against women, in particular domestic violence, rape, battery, laceration, crimes committed in the name of “honour” and cases of stoning.
    Para 44) The Secretary-General of the United Nations noted the decree amending the Penal Code with regard to crimes of violence against women ...
    Para 45) OHCHR/UNAMA noted that harmful acts of violence against women, including murder, beating, mutilation, child marriage and ba’ad, remained widespread, despite the Government’s concrete efforts to criminalize those practices and establish measures for accountability. Harmful practices that had been criminalized under the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, such as forced and child marriage, honour killings, ba’ad, badal (the exchange of women for marriage purposes to settle disputes) and forced self-immolation, were often confused as being aspects of Islamic law or teachings and therefore ingrained in the local traditions. The Mission documented 280 cases of murder and “honour killings” of women from January 2016 to December 2017. It found that the police had often failed to forward those cases to prosecutors. The majority of Afghan women continued to be denied fair treatment before the law, as discriminatory provisions in laws and policies were still prevalent. As such, law enforcement and other judicial practitioners, including prosecutors and courts, had often failed to enforce the Elimination of Violence against Women Law, resulting in widespread impunity for the criminal acts of violence against women. OHCHR/UNAMA consistently found that implementation of the Elimination of Violence against Women Law had been slow and non-uniform.

    Stakeholder Summary:
    Para 10) AIHRC noted that violence against women is one of the most serious violations of human rights. During 2014-2017, AIHRC registered, investigated and followed around 19,920 cases of violence against women and referred them to the relevant legal entities. Out of these cases, 845 cases were cases of women who were murdered. The real statistics of women's violence and murders are much higher. The prosecution and punishment of perpetrators of violence against women by government agencies, as well as the implementation of the EVAW Law and the Law for the Prevention of the Sexual Harassment against Women and Children have been ineffectively done and challenges remained unchanged. Statistics showed that the government and the law enforcement agencies have failed to properly and timely investigate cases of violence against women and cases of murder. AIHRC attributed that insecurity, corruption, the increased culture of impunity, lack of rule of law, the spread of harmful custom and tradition in society, lack of awareness of people of the law and human rights, poverty and economic problems are among the factors of violence against women which have not been adequately and practically addressed by the government. AIHRC reported that Taliban also continued to commit killings and extra judicial and arbitrary punishment of women in the area of under their control. AIHRC recalled that under Resolution 1325 and the SDGs, the government has to accelerate the process of gender mainstreaming in the departments.
    Para 34) HRW noted that violence against women, including rape, murder, mutilation and assault is widespread, and the perpetrators are rarely brought to justice. In the 2014 UPR, the Afghanistan delegation accepted numerous recommendations on improving implementation of the 2009 Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW law), including the measures recommended to Afghanistan by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women in July 2013. During the review, the Afghan delegation committed to implement the EVAW law, and that perpetrators of violence against women would be prosecuted and punished. However, HRW found that Afghan women seeking justice after facing violence continue to face formidable obstacles. Afghan authorities routinely turn victims away or pressure them to accept mediation. Mediation does not provide justice to female victims of serious crimes, offering victims only a promise from her abuser not to repeat the crime. In some case, mediators themselves inflict abuse, for example by ordering girls or women to be given as compensation for murder, forcing women and girls to marry men who raped them, or excusing murder in the name of “honor.” Afghan police and prosecutors continue to jail women and girls for on charges of “moral crimes” that include “running away” from home, and committing or attempting to commit sexual intercourse outside marriage “zina”, or having sex outside of marriage. Rape victims can be charged with “zina” and imprisoned. These girls and women are subjected to invasive vaginal and anal examinations performed by Afghan government doctors, sometimes repeatedly on the same girl or woman including young girls. Afghan officials claimed that the government had since banned the examinations, but officials have told HRW that the practice remained widespread, and many judges, prosecutors, and police officials told them that they routinely order “virginity tests.”
    Para 35) ODVV also noted that one of the most serious human rights violations in Afghanistan is violence against women, particularly girls. In 2017 there were 4340 cases of violence against 2286 women. This is while in the previous year there were approximately 2046 reported cases of violence against women. These figures indicate that not only violence against women in Afghanistan has not dropped, but the abuses have increased. There have also been report of 277 women being murdered, while only 40 of them have been prosecuted. This shows a weakness in enforcing the law, additionally, victims’ families’ were reluctant to file a complaint against perpetrators of crimes.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Bhutan

    Bhutan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Ensure gender equity in higher education institutions of the country by increasing the number of female students.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 88) The MoHE implemented a Strategy and Regulation which deals with women education in particular. Through these documents, women quota has been introduced, which is that 24% of all university students are girls in 2017.

  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Canada

    Canada
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    OAS
    OIF
    Commonwealth
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Question
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Not Followed up with a Recommendation
    Contents:
    What is the Government of Afghanistan doing to improve recruitment and retention of women into the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), and to reduce their harassment and discrimination within the ANSF?
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    UN Compilation

    Issue:
    • Violence against women / gender-based violence
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    The High Commissioner recommended that the Government invite ... the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences to visit the country. [Para 19]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Iceland

    Iceland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Issue:
    • International human rights instruments
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Submit its first periodic report without further delay and ensure full implementation of CEDAW and other international human rights conventions to which Afghanistan is a party.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 8) ... Provisions of ICCPR, CEDAW, CRC, ICESCR and other relevant conventions were considered.
    Para 9) The GIRoA, during periodic reporting, has developed three comparative reports on national laws in the light of international conventions of human rights; ... 3) report on comparative review of national laws in the light of CEDAW, All similarities, differences and flaws in the national laws have been identified and highlighted, and specific
    recommendations have been made through the above reports to address such discrepancies.
    Para 139) The process of preparation of second periodical report of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan on Elimination of All Kind of Discrimination against Women commenced on August 2009 and completed in June 2011 with technical support of UNWOMEN and financial support of Norway, Dutch and Danish embassies in Kabul.
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Stakeholder Summary

    Issue:
    • HIV and AIDS
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    18th session, February 2014
    Status:
    Neglected
    Contents:
    JS1 noted that the government should address the pressing need to deliver right- based and stigma-free health services for all Afghan citizens, particularly with HIV and People Who Inject Drugs. [Para 73]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    National Report

    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    N/A
    Contents:
    Student population which reached to one million during the Taliban and was limited only for boys, now in 2008 exceeds six million, one third of which are girls ... [Para 58]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    UN Compilation

    Issue:
    • Harmful practices based on cultural / traditional values
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    The High Commissioner noted that progress remains tentative, because of pervasive social, political and economic discrimination against women, as well as insecurity and the persistence of customary practices. [Para 11]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Stakeholder Summary

    Issue:
    • Early marriage
    • Harmful practices based on cultural / traditional values
    Type:
    Review Documentation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Reference Addressed
    Contents:
    The legal age of marriage for girls is 16 or 15 with the consent of her father or competent court. However, because of customary practices, approximately 57 per cent of girls marry before the age of 16. [Para 27]
  • State Under Review:

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan
    Regional group
    Asia-Pacific Group
    Political group
    OIC
    Source Of Reference:

    Finland

    Finland
    Regional group
    WEOG
    Political group
    EU
    Issue:
    • Gender equality
    Type:
    Recommendation
    Session:
    5th session, May 2009
    Status:
    Accepted
    Contents:
    Promote a public discussion on women's rights and encourage influential men- whether elders, clerics, politicians or others to participate in this discussion and raise awareness, especially amongst boys, of the importance of seeing women and girls as equal and respected partners in society.
    Implementation
    National Report:
    Para 57) The GIRoA has made efforts to promote human values, human rights and women's rights among local tribes through participation in tribal councils. It has also promoted and institutionalized the concept related to women's rights and human rights in the society through participating in mosques and religious institutions. The most important measure adopted in regard to raising public awareness about issues related to women's rights and human rights has been through audio, video and written media. Hereby, the concepts related to human rights and women's rights particularly regarding the legal age of marriage, prevention of forced marriages and violence against women and the right to education were broadcast by the judicial organs, MoWA, Ministry of Hajj and Religious Affairs and other relevant ministries.